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Swing Fall Hazards and How to Prevent Them

Swing Fall Hazards and How to Prevent Them

Swing falls are not as fun as they might sound at first. In fact, in all seriousness, swing falls can be extremely dangerous. Unfortunately, many people, when working at heights, fail to take swing into consideration. So, just what is swing? Swing is what occurs when you are wearing a Personal Fall Arrest System (PFAS – harness, lanyard, anchorage point) that is not anchored directly overhead. If a fall should occur, you would swing, like a pendulum, back toward the anchor point. In the process, you could strike – with great force – the structure you are working on or another nearby structure.

Three Secrets to Safety Management

Three Secrets to Safety Management

How can you take your safety management beyond simply reciting the rules and hoping people will comply?

Did You Miss a Great Safety Article in 2014?

Did You Miss a Great Safety Article in 2014?

Happy New Year! The beginning of the new year is a great time to reflect on the year gone by. This year we published a ton of great articles to help raise awareness of safety issues in the workplace. In case you missed some of them, below is a categorized list our safety articles from 2014.

How to Work on a Roof Without Fall Protection

How to Work on a Roof Without Fall Protection

Figuring out how to work on a roof without fall protection is easier than you think. Simply consider the task you are performing – whether that be maintenance, construction, or really anything else – assess the hazards, divide by the number of workers and factor in the use of personal protective equipment (adjusted for recent revisions to written policy) and you will find that without fail, every single time, you come to the same answer for how to work on a roof without fall protection: You don’t.

The Value of Safety [Infographic]

The Value of Safety [Infographic]

What value do you place on safety?

Complacency: Safety’s Worst Enemy

Complacency: Safety’s Worst Enemy

Safety has many enemies - budget, schedule, regulatory ignorance, and leadership indifference, to name a few – so maybe saying complacency is its worst enemy is a bit of hyperbole. Then again, maybe it’s not. Each of the examples I mentioned is lacking one key ingredient that sets complacency apart from the rest: a false sense of security. When money, time, or enforcement becomes an obstacle to safety, the workforce will usually know this. If they continue to do their job, it is probably with added measures of precaution. And, while heightened awareness alone does not make for satisfactory protection, it is better than nothing.

Positioning Devices: How Do They Differ from Personal Fall Arrest?

Positioning Devices: How Do They Differ from Personal Fall Arrest?

When considering fall protection solutions, people often consider Personal Fall Arrest Systems and rails as the only two options available. In some cases, that might be true, but in other cases it puts an undue burden on the person trying to come up with the solution by eliminating other safe, compliant options. In some cases, a Positioning Device System may be one of those options.

Five Unexpected Places Safety Railings Are Needed

Five Unexpected Places Safety Railings Are Needed

The following are five examples of places where this might occur.

It Won’t Happen to Me!

It Won’t Happen to Me!

This is an attitude most workers seem to have. And why not? No one goes to work, thinking, "I am going to get hurt today." Although it seems somewhat pessimistic, workers should be thinking "I could get hurt today, so I will take every precaution to prevent it." My husband, Russ, had the attitude "It won't happen to me". He woke up on the morning of November 8th, 1995, kissed me goodbye, looked in on Spencer, our two-year-old, and left for his job as a commercial painter. As soon as they got their spider unit (scaffolding) set up, management called everyone in for a safety meeting. This was considered nothing but an annoyance to Russ, but he signed the clipboard, and was just glad to come in out of the rain. He doesn't remember, to this day, what that meeting was about.

The Myth of the 5000 lb. Anchor Point

The Myth of the 5000 lb. Anchor Point

Anchor point selection can be difficult. For many safety professionals, it is a black and white area that offers no gray option in between. The rule says the anchor point must have the ability to support 5000 lbs. per person attached or it’s no good, right? Maybe not. Perhaps the reason that this belief is so widespread is that it’s the simplest way to enforce the rule. 5000 lbs., yes or no? Most people relying on safety personnel to interpret the OSHA standards will think it sounds plausible enough and find ways to be compliant. The catch is, though, that this is not exactly what the standard says. In fact, by following this cut-and-dried rule, you may be eliminating perfectly good anchor points in a situation where it’s already difficult to achieve proper fall protection.

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